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Studies in Australian History Week Twenty One

7 February, 2014

For week twenty, see our post on our first day back for 2014 because that’s all the history we got done, amongst excursions, appointments, sleepless nights and the like.

Week twenty one… We continued, and finished, reading the chapter in Our Sunburnt Country on World War One. We added the Rabbit Proof Fence to our timeline (after the previous Thursday’s art activity based on Rabbit Round Up Into An Old Mine).

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We then read the book In Flanders Fields. It’s a stunning picture book, mostly in black and white, set at the time of the Christmas Day ceasefire. It made me tear up, but then most war picture books do. I’d highly recommend the book.

20140204-111157.jpg We then read the poem, In Flanders Fields, on which the book was based.

Later in the week we read My Mother’s Eyes by Mark Wilson.

20140207-111813.jpg It’s a moving story, and while the fate of the boy soldier, William, isn’t spelled out, it is implied that he died like so many other young men – or boys – in the First World War. It was also good to get a different perspective, as A Day to Remember focused on Gallipoli whereas My Mother’s Eyes looked at the fighting in France.

We also completed our Rabbits artworks, creating plagues of animals with stamps we made. We discussed symmetry (slide and turn as opposed to flip symmetry).

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Finally, we’ve been reading poetry from Classic Australian Poems, edited by Christopher Chen.

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